Library News

"Edenfleet" - Author talk by Coventry Forbes, April 15

Edenfleet

We would like to invite patrons of the Lane Memorial Library to an author event on Monday, April 15th at 6:00 PM featuring our very own children's librarian Paulina Shadowens!  She will be happy to sign copies of her book for new fans, but requests that you BYOB - bring your own book (available from Amazon.com).

Writing as Coventry Forbes, Paulina has at long last realized her dream of publishing a novel, and is looking forward to sharing the experience of how that came to be.  We asked Paulina to take a moment and give a few thoughts on how this project grew and developed.

"In 2006 I was an underslept, overwhelmed library graduate student, taking four Master’s level courses while working four part-time jobs.  At one of these, my boss—God bless her!--said I could do whatever I wanted in between assisting students.  Since I yearned to take a vacation I could not afford financially or timewise, I decided to use these lulls to devise a “literary holiday” by writing a story located in one of my favorite places (England) and set in one of my favorite time periods (the early 1800s, when many of Jane Austen’s novels take place). 

I knew I wanted to take the elements found in everything from Jane Eyre to modern-day bodice rippers—the impoverished, strong-willed governess, the wealthy, equally strong-willed master, and the mysterious manor that looms about them—and see if I could do something fun and fresh with such familiar tale-telling. Something I hoped would give its readers the same sense of delightful escape and discovery I enjoyed while writing it.

I dabbled at this novel over the years, but finally turned to it in earnest when my life once again was challenging on every level. Re-entering Edenfleet, with its long-held secrets and inhabitants I truly loved, gave me a renewed sense of purpose and drive—and laughter. In creating this imaginary world, it gave my own world the color and lift it sorely needed.

All my life I have wanted to be an author—and now, thanks to the encouragement of friends, the patience and technical skill of co-workers, and providential timing—I realize with wonder that this is at last a fulfilled dream.

And now for the sequel..."

Weston Gallery : The Art of Automobiles, April 2019

The art of automobiles
This show is a collaboration between local artists Nicole Ellis and Tony Nicholls. Nicole is a painter and Tony is a photographer. This show was first created last October for Main Street Art in Newfields, NH. Prior to that show neither artist had met. They were brought together and found that their work complimented each other, having in some cases produced images that mirrored each other or was of a similar vehicle.

For this exhibit, Tony and Nicole have produced works that emphasize the colours, textures and lines of vehicles in various states of repair or disrepair. They encompass a wide variety of automobiles from both the USA and UK, some old, some restored, some battered, some bruised.

We invite our patrons to attend a reception for both artists on the evening of Monday, April 8th from 5:30 to 7:30 PM in the Weston Gallery.  Light refreshments will be provided.

Tony Nicholls

Tony Nicholls is an English photographer living and working in both New England and the UK. He has been involved in photography since college, but recently began developing those early skills and techniques to communicate a more mature vision.

"I take photographs in order to capture the world as I see it. I tend to concentrate on scenes and objects that have strong lines, contrast and textures, sometimes in black and white to emphasize these. Many of my photographs are panoramic to capture the world as I see it, the breadth of the scene, the sweep of the countryside. I apply a similar approach to portraits, trying to find the lines, shapes and colours that make 'the person'.

In this exhibition I am trying to portray details of the subjects, to abstract patterns on a simple surface, discovering the elements that make up the shapes, textures and contrasts. I try to enhance these to bring out the elements that I wish to reveal. Some of my work seeks to force the viewer to look deeper into the image so that they find otherwise hidden details in it."

Further examples of Tony's work can be found at https://500px.com/tony110

Nicole Ellis

...when I grow up I want to live by the ocean and be a painter.... ~ Nicole Ellis, age 6, in upstate New York.

Fast forward through many years of retail jobs, side painting projects scattered here and there and welcome to my new reality. I have now been able to paint full time for a year and a half. With the support of my husband, I launched my own painting business, NicoleEllisArtist in 2018 and started my lifelong dream of painting unique images from quiet New England towns and the surrounding landscapes. With the realization that "none of us is guaranteed a tomorrow " and a passion for the process of painting to capture the unsung moments I see in rural New England areas, I set off to pursue my dream. My first year I curated or attended 19 events and sold 36 paintings total, pinching myself at every sale and being encouraged by friends and family.

2019 takes me into the second year of my endeavor and I look forward to a fun full summer of outdoor events: this year I've added farmers markets to my venue list as it blends my love of old barns, rusty trucks and mottled fields with other local makers and consumers who appreciate hand crafted goods to support a local economy.

The encouraging words I receive at outdoor art shows or gallery openings propels me forward to keep painting images that I love, be it an abandoned old truck, a collection of maple buckets looking like blue bonnets, the peeling paint on a time worn barn or craggily rocks of a seascape with a weary fishing shack. I look for the character present in each of these images and use paint to celebrate the life found within them.

It's by far the most rewarding chapter of my life so far and finally celebrates the life within me, found at age 6; waiting to be expressed

Learn with a Librarian - Bird Watching 101

Birdwatching 101

Would you like to learn something new in a new way? Learn with a Librarian is a lightly facilitated study group where participants can meet with a group of like-minded people to take an online course together with our free-to-patrons Universal Class.

Our first session will be facilitated by technical services librarian Kevin Robbitts, who will be leading Bird Watching 101.  The group will meet on Wednesdays April 10th, 24th, & May 8th from 1:30 - 2:30 pm in the library study room just off of the Teen area.

Course Description

Who do you think benefits the most from feeding and observing wild birds - the birds or us?  People of all ages, from all walks of life, study birds with interests that range from occasional pleasure viewing to an outright passion resulting in lengthy trips and major investments.  But one thing all bird watchers share is the excitement generated when a particular bird of interest or rarity is spotted -- similar to the thrill of the hunt, it satisfies our need to discover. Unlike traditional hunting, however, bird watching is about admiring the beauty of the birds in their natural habitats.

Bird watching is such an exciting world to explore.  Amazing birds can even be found in your own backyard! There is a great deal of joy derived from an afternoon spent watching these beautiful creatures. Many families participate in bird watching across generations, with grandparents and grandchildren often finding a shared interest when they are bird watching together.

This self-paced online course covers bird identification and location, feeding, types of birdhouses, equipment, emergency care and behavior and habitats. Whether you are a casual backyard bird watcher or a serious enthusiast, you'll soon discover that the more you watch birds the more you will want to learn about them.

The class is 11 Lessons & will take about 5 Hours to complete at a pace chosen by each patron.

While we encourage anyone to enjoy the course online, we ask that those interested in attending the study group register at the front desk.

"Counter Culture" - Author talk and book signing

Counter Culture

Eleanor Dunfey-Freiburger will visit the Lane Library on Tuesday, March 26th at 6:30 PM to present her new book Counter Culture: Clams, Convents and a Circle of Global Citizens. This recently published memoir is an uplifting story of her family's origins as mill workers with 12 children to feed, who built a hospitality empire from a luncheonette and fried clam stand into what would eventually grow to be the Omni International Hotels. The author's profits from the sale of this book will go to the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur who have served immigrant communities at St Patrick's School, Lowell, MA, for 167 years.  (For those who attend, be sure to ask Eleanor about the Dunfey family connection to our very own Lamie's Inn in Hampton.)

“This spirited and spiritual journey of the Dunfey family is shared in loving, often humorous stories that reach from a mill town in America to townships in South Africa. Thank God for parents who inspired their twelve children to make a difference in our world.” — Archbishop Emeritus Desmond and Mrs. Leah Tutu

“If you want to learn how to achieve in business, faith, social justice, and politics ... then this is the book for you.” —Monica McWilliams, founder of Women’s Coalition Party, Northern Ireland, and global advocate for human rights

About the Author

Eleanor Dunfey-Freiburger is the youngest of twelve children. She is a graduate of Emmanuel College in Boston and the University of San Francisco and was a Sister of Notre Dame de Namur for thirteen years. She is professor emerita of ethics and civic engagement at Southern New Hampshire University, co-chair for 30 years of Global Citizens Circle and the recipient of honorary degrees from Southern New Hampshire University and Franklin Pierce University. Eleanor is married to Dr. James Freiburger, professor emeritus at SNHU. They have two grown children and five grandchildren.

Weston Gallery : Ten Piscataqua Photographers, March 2019

Ten Piscataqua Photographers

The locally published coffee table book Ten Piscataqua Photographers features the portfolios of 10 regional fine art photographers.  Prints from these portfolios will be on display in the downstairs Weston Gallery throughout the month of March.  An opening reception and book signing will be held on Thursday, March 14th from 5 to 7 PM, and offer a time for patrons to talk to the photographers, buy a first edition of the book, and have it signed by the artist(s).

Ten Piscataqua is envisioned as a series of coffee table books to bring artists and their community together. Each title is a collection of portfolios for the community to discover, explore, and celebrate the local genius in our midst. Ten Piscataqua Photographers is the first in the series. The intent is to build more intimate connections between artists and art lovers sharing the same geography. The book is edited by Phillip Augusta with introductions by Laura Pope.

The Photographers

Carol Van Loon is a black and white photographer from Dover, NH. Her intimate portfolio All About Me, is an evocative exploration of her body at age 60—fearlessly taking the selfie to another level.

Philip Case Cohen‘s portfolio features a selection of architectural and scenic landscapes from his popular photoblog, The Daily Portsmouth.

Gary Samson is a fine art photographer, photography educator, and New Hampshire’s 7th Artist Laureate. His portfolio Unburdened Beauty samples a decade of portrait and figurative work with women.

Peripatetic and prolific, Rich Beauchesne is chief photojournalist for Seacoast Media Group. His portfolio Motorcycle Week tours the spectators and spectacles of Laconia’s annual bike rally.

Frog eggs, nests, tricks of light, and all manner of creepy-crawlies populate Cheryle St. Onge’s portfolio titled Natural Findings. These images evoke a powerful nostalgia—discovering, or rather rediscovering, the wonders of nature through the curious eyes of children.

In The Old Ones, Bear Kirkpatrick's portraits of men and women are multilayered wonders. The subject is first decorated in fantastic costume, often made from natural props (eg: mud, feathers, and insects) and then layered within a contextual background drawn from the old masters. The results are portraits like you’ve never seen before.

The work of Rob Karosis exhibits a consistent aesthetic, no matter what the subject. His choices are guileless, authentic, and without gimmick. His portfolio The Texture of Light draws from the natural world with images in both b&w and color.

Digital innovator Douglas Prince juxtaposes diverse visual elements to conjure up a surprisingly new photographic world, not unlike a visual poem. Images from his portfolio Panaesthetic explore the numberless possibilities offered by digital image making tools and processes.

Charter Weeks has been documenting America for nearly five decades. His portfolio of that name introduces you to people and places around the country you might think you know, but then you’re surprised with a gritty revelation or a powerful juxtaposition you didn’t notice at first.

In her photo essay The Organic Year, Karrah Kwasnik captures both the romance and the hard labor of clean sustainable agriculture. She takes us beyond the produce label for a taste of what organic really means in terms of farm life at Tuckaway and Sheltering Rock Farms in Lee, NH.

AARP Tax Help Schedule - 2019

2019 AARP Tax Help

 No Appointments

Requirements:

Having last year’s (2017) tax return and all of this year’s (2018) tax related information such as W-2s, Social Security account numbers, property and personal tax records, Social Security income, medical expenses, interest and dividend statements will make the process go more smoothly. A picture ID must be presented.

To have a refund deposited directly to your personal bank account you must bring your checking or savings account number and bank routing information.

State returns for Massachusetts, Maine and others can be completed and filed in conjunction with your federal return.

Job Posting - Children's Room Page

Lane Memorial Library JOB OPPORTUNITY

The Children’s Room is currently looking for a Library Page for 4 hours a week. Work involves shelving books and other materials, checking that materials are in their appropriate places, and other library tasks as needed.  Consistent attention to detail is a must.

Skills/Qualifications:

The library page must be able to file materials within the appropriate classification scheme, particularly the Dewey Decimal Classification System.  Instruction will be given in this.

•Ability to alphabetize and put things in numerical order.

•Ability to understand and follow oral and written instructions in English at an eighth (8th) grade level.

•Ability to learn routine library procedures.

•Ability to adhere to library policies and procedures, including dress code.

•Ability to work independently and thoroughly with a minimum of supervision.

•Minimum of 14 years old.

Minimum Physical Qualifications

Must be able to:

•Push and pull library book trucks weighing up to fifty pounds across seventy feet of carpet.

•Carry up to ten pounds (10 lbs) of books across the length of the Children’s Room (approximately 70 feet).

•Stand for prolonged periods of time

•Bend and stretch to reach high and low shelves

The current salary is $7.25 an hour.

Applications are available at both the Adult and Children’s circulation desks and must be submitted to Paulina Shadowens, Head of Children’s Services, no later than Friday, February 15, 2019. Applications will be reviewed by the department head and you will be contacted if an interview will be scheduled.

Lane Memorial Library is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

ADA concerns: “The Library Page position may be performed with partial physical disabilities although the position is physically demanding and requires bending, lifting, and reaching. Persons with visual disabilities may have difficulty filing Library materials, although speech and hearing disabilities would present few problems. Intellectual impairment may not hamper performance where the ability to file quickly is present”. —from OCLC Computer Library Center

Great Bay Sailor Concert - December 18th at 6:30 PM

Great Bay Sailor

Plan to bring the family and join us on Tuesday, December 18th at 6:30 PM in the downstairs Lane Room for a special Yuletide concert by local folk group Great Bay Sailor.  Promising an evening of music that they call "the hidden sounds of the season", the GBS Yuletide repertoire is comprised of songs from traditions honored in such diverse settings as isolated Irish village churches, English pubs, the mountain cabins of Appalachia, Hebridean households, Canadian social clubs, and the creative genius of contemporary bards and songwriters.  This is a Christmas that you have never heard before!

As a special treat, and as an end-of-year "thank you" to our wonderful patrons, the library will provide hot mulled cider and a delicious assortment of staff-baked cookies for those who arrive a little bit early.  The concert is free of charge, open to the public, and suitable for all ages.

About the performers:

Great Bay Sailor Group Photo

Great Bay Sailor performs a brash but thoughtful brand of “contemporary/traditional” folk music.  The crew is composed of singers Bruce MacIntyre, Steve Carrigan and Mike Blaire; fiddle player, Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki; multi-instrumentalist Taylor Whiteside and noted Nashville strings man, Jim Prendergast.   A hallmark of the band is its eclectic repertoire of maritime, Irish/Scottish and ol’ timey songs and tunes, out of which the band weaves a rollicking, toe tapping, romantic, bitter-sweet and soul-soothing musical tapestry for the enjoyment of listening audiences in Northern New England.

Job Opening - Children's Services

LibraryLane Memorial Library JOB OPPORTUNITY

The Children’s Room is currently looking for a Library Page for 4 hours a week. Work involves shelving books and other materials, checking that materials are in their appropriate places, and other library tasks as needed.   Consistent attention to detail is a must.

Skills/Qualifications:

The library page must be able to file materials within the appropriate classification scheme, particularly the Dewey Decimal Classification System.  Instruction will be given in this.

  • Ability to alphabetize and put things in numerical order.
  • Ability to understand and follow oral and written instructions in English at an eighth (8th) grade level.
  • Ability to learn routine library procedures.
  • Ability to adhere to library policies and procedures, including dress code.
  • Ability to work independently and thoroughly with a minimum of supervision.
  • Minimum of 14 years old.

Minimum Physical Qualifications

Must be able to:

  • Push and pull library book trucks weighing up to fifty pounds across seventy feet of carpet.
  • Carry up to ten pounds (10 lbs) of books across the length of the Children’s Room (approximately 70 feet).
  • Stand for prolonged periods of time
  • Bend and stretch to reach high and low shelves

The current salary is $7.25 an hour.

Applications are available at both the Adult and Children’s circulation desks and must be submitted to Paulina Shadowens, Head of Children’s Services, no later than Tuesday, November 27, 2018. Applications will be reviewed by the department head and you will be contacted if an interview will be scheduled.

Lane Memorial Library is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

ADA concerns: “The Library Page position may be performed with partial physical disabilities although the position is physically demanding and requires bending, lifting, and reaching. Persons with visual disabilities may have difficulty filing Library materials, although speech and hearing disabilities would present few problems. Intellectual impairment may not hamper performance where the ability to file quickly is present”. —from OCLC Computer Library Center

 

Culture Keepers / Culture Makers Art Exhibit - Weston Gallery, October 2018

Culture Keepers

This artwork depicts how life could be—without segregation, without bias, without the terrible lack of connection among many of us human beings. The art was created through group sessions led by artist Richard Haynes, who developed a tracing technique so that anyone, artist or not, could join his trade and express the wish to change our culture. Fourteen people from the Seacoast participated to learn how artists are, not only culture keepers, but also, culture makers.

Haynes asked participants to imagine their art being uncovered by the people of a future generation. He asked, “What do you want people to discover from your drawing? How will you show them what it was like to be living in a time when we were emerging into a world without racism?”

As a group, they defined “diversity” and “racial unity” and then were asked, “How did you learn bias and prejudice in the first place?” The art students named systems: our families, our schools, our political and social cultures and healthcare—citing all the opportunities given only to white people in order to succeed and thrive. They asked themselves how we might have colluded with those systems of oppression—or how we confronted them. And, for eight weeks, they talked about their lives, laughed and cried together, and imagined a better future.

This project was organized by the Racial Unity Team and supported by a grant from the NH Charitable Foundation. Find the Racial Unity Team on Facebook or email them at racialunityteam1@gmail.com.

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